Connect With Us

Twitter Facebook LinkedIn EmailRSS

Contact Us

Email eileen@visualinsight.net
Phone: 1.707.486.2441

Latest from @visualinsight

Publications

Our approach to visual communication is integrally linked with to our research and writing on learning, creativity, and organizations. In addition to writing and illustrating articles and books for major publishers in our field, we also publish visual books and papers, including for clients who are ready to diffuse their ideas.

The Engelbart Hypothesisby Valerie Landau and Eileen Clegg, in conversation with Douglas C. Engelbart, published by NextNow NextPress Collaboratory.

“Centuries of silo thinking and win-or-die ideological and economic competition have finally generated a global crisis. Now either we collaborate on a global scale to solve the new global problems, or we won’t survive. The technology is available to do so. Billions of intelligences are waiting to participate. How do we bring the two together? We are at a decision crossroads. And as this book vividly demonstrates, Doug Engelbart as been there all along, waiting for us with the answer.”

–James Burke
Emmy-Award Winning Historian

The Visual Insight Workbook – How to Communicate with Visual Language
This workbook is part of Visual Insight’s trainings and virtual coaching.
We are interested in the questions, ideas, and inputs from our colleagues and students of Visual Insight.
2020 Forecast: Map of Future Forces Affecting EducationOnline interactive map by Institute for the Future and the Knowledgeworks Foundation. Visual Insight contributed research and visual journalism to the project.
The Corporate University Workbook by Kevin B. Wheeler with illustrations and editing by Eileen Clegg, published by Jossey Bass Pfeiffer. This future-oriented book gives companies tools to develop employees who are capable of adapting to rapid changes and who deliver results. The Workbook, along with the CD-ROM, is filled with the tools, templates, and activities companies can use to transform everyday work into on-the-job learning and knowledge exchange.

“This is a great read for learning professionals. It provides practical, usable strategies and approaches for enterprise learning.”
–Elliott Masie, The MASIE Center

“Into the Future,” article/illustration by Eileen Clegg/Gary Newman for Threshold Magazine about educational technologies 5-30 years out (Summer, 2004). Click here for PDF of the article or download the entire issue with articles by Alan Kay, Chris Dede and other thought leaders through Zinio.
Creating a Learning Culture: Strategy, Technology and Practice, published by Cambridge University Press, is a series of essays edited by Marcia Connor and James Clawson of Darden Business School, including “The Agility Factor” by Eileen Clegg and Clark Quinn, with Eileen’s illustrations in each section.
Claiming Your Creative Self: True Stories from the Everyday Lives of Women. (New Harbinger Publication, 1999)
This book by Eileen Clegg with Meg McConahey, Susan Swartz and Deborah Swietzer, tells the inspiring stories of thirteen women who were able to keep in touch with their own creative spirit and follow it to amazing places. These seemingly ordinary women pursue creative lives while raising children, working at less than glamorous day jobs and connecting with others and themselves, demonstrating how everyday women can become extraordinary when they tap into their creative selves and search for their own truths.
“Future of Global e-Education” executive summary report (69KB PDF)
A report by Institute for the Future for Vivendi Prospective envisioning alternative futures for e-learning in Europe, Asia and the U.S.A.
The Education Technology Horizon Map
(U.S. Department of Education, with IFTF and the Grove Consultants)
Future Schools: Seamless? Timeless? Themeless?
A paper for the U.S. Department of Education’s “Preparing Teachers for Tomorrow” project.
Window into Talent
An interactive website on the future of talent and learning.
Website design by Gary Newman
Becoming A  Wise Parent Becoming a Wise Parent for Your Grown Child: How to Give Love and Support Without Meddling (New Harbinger Publications, 1997)
In this warm and practical guide, Dr. Betty Frain with coauthor Eileen Clegg, gives parents a step-by-step approach to handling issues that arise with grown children. Filled with lively real world examples and challenging self-assessment questions, it shows you how to gain some distance from the issues you’re facing, put your adult children’s problems in perspective, and speak up or take action in a way that will strengthen your relationship with them. Featured on the DVD of the 2006 romantic comedy “Failure to Launch.”
Bay Area Science CollaboratoryA web environment for teachers linking free online science resources (from the nine Bay Area science and technology museums) to California’s science standards.
History of Corporate and Executive Education
Ongoing project with IFTF and Global Learning Resources, 4 X 12 foot graphic map documenting corporate education over 120 years in historical context, leading to a forecast through 2010
The Nature of Innovation: An Exploration
Chuck Sieloff, Patty Zablock for Institute for the Future
The Extremophile Response
A new framework for organizational adaptability inspired by nature’s super-survivors ˇ organisms that thrive in boiling undersea vents, frozen seas, and other punishing environments. These organisms have toolkits for adaptation that inspire new thinking about change in human systems.
Goodbye Good Girls: Letting Go of THE RULES and Taking Back Your Self by Eileen Clegg and Susan Swartz. (New Harbinger Publications, 1998)
Using the ancient art of story telling, this book provides insight into the power of the subtle messages women are still receiving about “following the rules.”  These stories help women mindfully free ourselves of those constraints so they can trade in the good-girl syndrome and find their authentic, productive selves.
Lifelong Learning: Informative vs. Transformative
Nearly half of adults in the United States are pursuing coursework outside a degree program. What are the reasons? And what are the implications for organizations? This paper is based on a complication of our own research and some startling statistics